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Kill Me Three Times

Kill Me Three Times, a film I had to watch two times to fully enjoy. I’m a distracted viewer, I fiddle, I rarely retain all the proper information or catch the minor details the first time through a movie for this reason. This can occasionally be frustrating for both myself and those I view movies with but it’s the reality that I live with.

Now I’m not writing a review of myself (that would be far too lengthy and filled with personal anecdotes that you, the movie review audience, are not privy too) so let me return to the film at hand. It was released in the US earlier this year and, ever the Simon Pegg fan, I watched A Fantastic Fear of Everything (2012), Hector and the Search for Happiness (2014), as well as this film (okay, I have not forgetting Run Fatboy RunBurke & Hare, or At World’s End but I feel the direction of these three is vastly different). These are all settled firmly in the dark/awkward comedy realm and while missing Edgar Wright’s direction and Nick Frost’s humorous side-kick antics, still stand together in Simon Pegg’s growing seemingly-independent repertoire. I will acknowledge that none of these probably count as independent films but none of them are large box office films either.

Kill Me Three Times is told in a non-linear fashion. It’s split into three acts: Kill Me Once, Kill Me Twice, Kill Me Three Times. It follows the story of a hit-man, Charlie Wolfe, who is played by Simon Pegg, but it also follows a dental couple in need of funds to pay off a gambling debt, an unfaithful girlfriend in a dangerous relationship with a bar owner, and on a smaller scale, a crooked cop (though he serves more to further the plot than anything else).

It’s funny, it’s bloody, it’s entertaining, and it probably won’t take you two viewings to discover the same information that I did. The cinematography at times seems to exist to pat itself on the back for the wonderfully planned-out shots and the lighting adds to this feeling at times but I enjoyed it and appreciated the additional courtesy shots that sold me on the violence, or the secrecy, or the romance.